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All ProductsMusic pdf eBookJazz ImprovisationJazz Theory and TechniqueJazz Exercises, Patterns and Sequences1 2 3 5 Musical Permutations

Permutation Station 1 2 3 5

A practical exploration into the four-note permutations of Major Scale steps 1-2-3-5.

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USD 9.99

4.14MB PDF File

"Permutation Station 1 2 3 5" (69 pages)

"Permutation Station 1 2 3 5", focuses on and specifically highlights the practical usage of the 24 permutations of Major scale steps 1, 2, 3 & 5 as an improvisational tool - while presenting it in the style of a thesaurus or reference book.

The 1235 tetrachord (C-D-E-G in C), whether played or sung, is probably the most common and recognizable note grouping in Western music, irregardless of style.

Mathematically speaking, any group of 4 unique items yields 24 mutually exclusive arrangements of those same 4 items. In other words, 4 notes yields 24 unique permutations.

"Permutation Station 1 2 3 5" is organized according to the interval distance between each of the parallel 4-note permutation groupings - spaced in min & Maj 2nds & 3rds, as well as Perfect 4ths & 5ths).

Because of the extreme tonal nature of the 1235 tetrachord, it makes for a much more interesting and musical practice experience to play its permutations in ascending or descending fashion in half steps (Semitone Cycle), whole steps (Whole Tone Cycle), minor 3rds (Diminished Cycle), Major 3rds (Augmented Cycle), and the Cycle of Fourths (5ths), than if one would simply play them in one key, as in the graphic on the previous page; which would be pretty monotonous.

Working each permutation through all of the above mentioned cycles also familiarizes one with the different possible melodic & harmonic connection and resolution points between them, as it would by playing an actual tune.

The technique of using permutations in improvisation is something that happens naturally to some extent over time, the longer one stays at it. Using the sequences in this book as a reference, it is suggested to play through them and take note of the one's that you like.

There's definitely a lot to like!